Orphans

Current Projects working with orphans:

  • vanachildcare
  • grantsforgrandparentszambia
  • eagleswingszambiatransitcentre

Orphans

on Wednesday, 04 September 2013. Posted in Bangladesh, Brazil, Myanmar, Burundi, The Congo, Ecuador, Ethiopia, The Facts, India, Indonesia, Ghana, FAQ, Liberia, Malawi, Mexico, Mozambique, Romania, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Orphans, Thailand, Kenya, Cambodia, Zambia, Papua New Guinea, The Philippines

Orphans 2 Be A HERO

Every day 5,760 more children become orphans

UNICEF and global partners define an orphan as a child who has lost one or both parents.

By this definition there were over 132 million orphans in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean in 2005.

This large figure represents not only children who have lost both parents, but also those who have lost a father but have a surviving mother or have lost their mother but have a surviving father.

Of the more than 132 million children classified as orphans, only 13 million have lost both parents. Evidence clearly shows that the vast majority of orphans are living with a surviving parent grandparent, or other family member. 95 per cent of all orphans are over the age of five.

Current Project - New Life - Orphanage - Yangon, Myanmar

on Monday, 25 March 2013. Posted in Current Projects, Myanmar, Health - Natural Disaster - Community Development, Vocational Training - Self Sufficiency - Income Generation, HIV/AIDs & other diseases, Extreme Poverty, Homelessness, Infrastructure, Natural Disasters, Orphans, Sustainability

Myanmar Be A HERO1

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City: Yangon
Project:  Orphanage
Partner:  New Life Foundation

Work commenced by a small group of dedicated people in South East Asia over a decade ago to care for the orphans in Yangon.

Over 300 children have been rescued, and now live in a loving environment where they receive their daily needs, medical care and education. Based in three different locations, they will be nurtured to become leading citizens within their respective regions.

Currently New Life has a rice paddy for sustainable growth. This will provide income, training and employment. To date, 44 acres is under crop, with a number of small crops grown in the off season.

Volunteers have also assisted in disaster relief, building medical clinics, building new housing and joining education teams.

Australians you can sponsor these children

HERO IT

on Wednesday, 18 September 2013. Posted in Volunteer, Operation Educate A Child, Vocational Training - Self Sufficiency - Income Generation, HERO Partner, How to Be A HERO, Infrastructure, Orphans, Sustainability

Cambodia Computer Lab Be A HERO

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Computers transform communities

The developed world is now driven by technology.

Through donations of in-date computers and affordable shipping through our HERO Partners, Be A HERO is transforming communities through providing IT equipment and installation.

Donations for shipping would enable more equipment to get to the communities that need it.

Volunteers are often needed to collect and pack the donated computers.

Consider a HERO Holiday if your skills lie in IT and you would like to transform a community.

Issues - Zambia

on Thursday, 19 September 2013. Posted in HIV/AIDs & other diseases, Extreme Poverty, Homelessness, Orphans, Zambia

Hunger

According to preliminary information released to the Southern African Development Community by the National Vulnerability Assessment Committee, Zambia's 2006 agricultural season was generally good with widespread rainfall, despite the late onset of rains in parts of the north and east. In some low-lying areas, excessive rains have limited crop production. Nonetheless, cereal production and carryover stock broke even with the country’s consumption needs of about 1.6 million metric tonne. Heavy rains, did however, cause soil erosion and degradation as well as damage to bridges and roads, all of which has prevented people from accessing markets to purchase seeds and fertiliser. Nutrition is expected to deteriorate in the next few months due to the desperate selling of agricultural produce and poor water and sanitation, which is likely to exacerbate the nutritional status of vulnerable people. Zambia is one of the world's poorest countries. Poverty and food insecurity are widespread in both rural and urban areas, and the country remains extremely vulnerable to recurring natural disasters, including floods, drought and animal disease. Food production levels vary widely from year to year. Food security is fragile because subsistence farmers depend on yearly rainfall and traditional hoe cultivation, and even in years of national food surplus, many subsistence farmers or households often struggle. The HIV/AIDS pandemic has exacerbated food insecurity levels and contributed to a decline in socioeconomic activity. Quite simply those who would have previously farmed their land and provided for their families are now either dead or dying. The World Food Program (WFP) plans to provide food aid to about 555,000 people in Zambia from July through to December 2006 under their Protracted Relief and Recovery Operation. Distributions will target HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and Mother-and-Child health clinics; Programs for orphans and other vulnerable children; and Food-for-Assets and Food-for-Training projects. WFP will need about 30,000 metric tonnes of grain to meet these needs. In addition, WFP school-feeding activities will provide daily hot meals to over 185,500 vulnerable schoolchildren. WFP is also providing food aid to 69,000 refugees from Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo who live in camps and remote settlements in Zambia, and rely totally on WFP for their basic food needs. (1)

(1) Ref: http://www.wfp.org/country_brief

 

Issues - The Philippines

on Thursday, 19 September 2013. Posted in HIV/AIDs & other diseases, Extreme Poverty, Homelessness, Human Trafficking, Natural Disasters, Orphans, Slave Labour & Exploitation, The Philippines

In the cities, neglected and abandoned children find themselves in the streets fending for themselves and vulnerable to the various evils of the urban jungle such as drug addiction, crimes and commercial sexual exploitation. Children who are neglected or abandoned are easy prey not only to accidents but to commercial sexual exploitation, drugs, crime and unwanted pregnancies.   Incidents of child abuse is still on the rise especially child sexual abuse. Also on the rise are reports of physical abuse and maltreatment of children. According to the statistics, there are approximately 40,000 to 50,000 street children of all categories in Metro Manila.  Studies conducted reveal that the number of street children range from 2 to 3% of the child and adult population.  The national project on street children estimated the number of street children at over 220,000 in 65 major cities as of 1993.   There are now about 350 government and non government agencies that are responding to street children and their families.  The government has given special focus on helping street children with programs focused on health and nutrition, educational assistance, parenting sessions, livelihood and skills training, residential care, foster care and adoption. However for as long as there would be squatter colonies sprouting in urban areas and for as long as there are not enough jobs, street children will continue to dominate in the streets.   In a 1993 survey of households, some 16% of households surveyed have children below 12 years old who are left unattended with no supervising adult in the house. This translates to one in six households where children are without adult supervision.  

Current efforts to fight child abuse are focused on tri-media campaign, information dissemination, raising awareness in the family, school and community of the evils of child abuse.  There is also a need for a more systematic effort at helping victims deal with the psychological trauma and scars of child abuse through proper psychological counseling programs that target not only the abused child but the family as well.

Background

The growing number of street children found in urban areas has long been a concern of the government.  Continuing efforts by the government and non-government agencies to provide services for both the street children and their families never seem to be enough. Street children are the largest number of vulnerable and exploited children in many countries with ages ranging from 5-18 years old. These children ply the sidewalks in a desperate attempt to eke out a living.   The Salvation Army Joyville Children’s Home is a rehabilitation center located in Pantay Road, Barangay Bukal, Tanay, Rizal, South of Manila. It is an ideal place for rehabilitation program because it is far from the city and the facilities offer better opportunities for wholesome development.     The major issues facing the children of this region are:-      Hunger & Poverty
    Diseases
    Natural Disasters
    Exploitation & Discrimination.

Hunger & Poverty   

In Metro Manila, where population growth, urbanization and migration continuously increase, children are often forced by circumstances to help their families earn a living. Most street children are of poor parents who have migrated from rural areas to find better job opportunities in the city, but lack of education renders them ill-equipped to earn or survive in the city.  Current population projections for July 2007 are 91 077 287 people, of this 31 458 591 or 34.5 % are children.    Statistics from the World Fact book, note that the percentage of the population of the Philippines who are living below the poverty line is 40%. The unemployment rate from the same source states that as at 2006 the rate is 7.9% of the population or approximately 7 200 000 persons. For comparison that is 1/3 of the Australian Population. The Philippines public debt is estimated to be 61.6% of their GDP. (1)   (1) Ref: (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/)  

Diseases

“Every minute of every day, a child under the age of 15 becomes infected with HIV”.  (1) Many diseases affect the children of the Philippines the most prevalent are HIV/Aids, Tuberculosis, Hepatitis A, Typhoid, Dengue Fever, Malaria and Bacterial Diarrhoea.   Of the 15 years to 49 years age group there are believed to be 7 195 105 people affected with the HIV/Aids virus. (2)  

(1) Ref:  http://www.unaids.org/en/HIV_data (2) Ref:  http://www.unaids.org/en/HIV_data  

Natural Disasters

The Philippines lie within the typhoon belt for this region. There is an average of 15 typhoons per year and 5-6 cyclonic storms affect this area as well. Mudslides caused by the uncontrolled deforestation of the area also contribute to the natural disasters of the area along with landslides, active volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis. (1)  

(1) Ref:  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/

Exploitation & Discrimination  

    Child sexual abuse remains controversial, the most concealed and under reported form of sexual abuse. To date, reported cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of children are increasing. In 1997, the reported cases of child abuse received by the Department of Social Welfare and Development were 4,394 - 53% of which were sexually abused.  The real extent of this problem is greater than what statistics show because of a number of unreported cases.
      Accurate figures for trafficking are difficult to obtain due to the illicit & illegal nature of the practice.
    It was estimated by the UN in 2003, that over 1 million children are being illegally involved around the world in Child Sex Trafficking.  It is more than likely this figure has increased according to past data information.  Of this number one third are believed to come from the Asia region and a significant majority of these are young girls between the ages of 12 – 18 years old.”
    Prostitution exists in nearly all the Countries of the World… “It is exacerbated by economic & social upheaval, extreme poverty, deprivation and excessive consumerism”… (2)
    You can, for $ 1.00 (AUS) buy a 12 year old girl off the street and own her for the night; she will be yours to do whatever you want.
    The demand for domestic servants, cheap labour, adoption, prostitution, and pornography are what drives the illegal practices of human trafficking. (1)
    The street child works under the heat of the sun or in the dark of the night from 6 to 16 hours, seven days a week, often in a combination of “occupations” each considered their only means to survive. Street children have a bleak present and an uncertain future.  Life in the street is a constant struggle to overcome the various negative elements that threaten to overtake and destroy the hope for survival.  In the cities, neglected and abandoned children find themselves in the streets fending for themselves and vulnerable to the various evils of the urban jungle such as drug addiction, crimes and commercial sexual exploitation. Children who are neglected or abandoned are easy prey not only to accidents but to commercial sexual exploitation, drugs, crime and unwanted pregnancies.

  (1) Ref:  http://www.childwise.net. (2) Ref:  http://www.crin.org/themes/ViewTheme.

The Facts - State Of The World - Children

on Tuesday, 19 June 2012. Posted in The Facts, Projects, HIV/AIDs & other diseases, War and Conflict, Extreme Poverty, Exploitation, Homelessness, Human Trafficking, Natural Disasters, Orphans, Slave Labour & Exploitation, War and Conflict

  • An estimated 10 million children have been forced into the sex industry
  • About 500 million children live with debilitating hunger
  • 134 million children have no access to any school whatsoever
  • 15 million children are orphaned as a result of AIDS
  • 246 million children work, with 171 million engaged in the worst forms of child labour
  • 265 million children have not been immunized against any disease
  • Over one third of children have to live in dwellings with more than five people per room
  • Over half a billion children have no toilet facilities whatsoever
  • Almost half a billion children lack access to published information of any kind
  • 376 million children have more than a 15-minute walk to water and or are using unsafe water sources
  • 300,000 young people are exploited as child soldiers

Issues - Cambodia

on Monday, 18 June 2012. Posted in HIV/AIDs & other diseases, War and Conflict, Extreme Poverty, Exploitation, Homelessness, Human Trafficking, Natural Disasters, Orphans, Slave Labour & Exploitation, Cambodia, War and Conflict

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The UN ranks Cambodia as one of the world’s poorest countries and the people of Poipet have very little. As a border town Poipet is home to many Cambodians who hope to find work in Thailand. Most fail, and are relegated to the huge slum communities, becoming drawn into the town’s underground world of illegal gambling, prostitution, and sex trafficking. At particular risk are the 300 street children who daily carry packages across the border for the equivalent of only seven cents per delivery, sleeping in the open at night. Many of these children are kidnapped, trafficked across borders, and forced to work in the international sex trade.

Issues - Exploitation - Kenya

on Monday, 18 June 2012. Posted in The Facts, HIV/AIDs & other diseases, Extreme Poverty, Exploitation, Homelessness, Human Trafficking, Infrastructure, Orphans, Kenya

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Kenya is a country of origin, destination, and transit for victims trafficked for the purposes of sexual exploitation and forced labor. Victims are trafficked from South Asian and East Asian countries and the Middle East through Kenya to European destinations for sexual exploitation. Asian nationals, principally Indians, Bangladeshi, and Nepalese, are trafficked into Kenya and coerced into bonded labor in the construction and garment industries. Kenyan children are trafficked internally from rural areas to urban centers and coastal areas into involuntary servitude, including work as street vendors and day laborers, and into prostitution. Women and children are trafficked from Burundi and Rwanda to coastal areas in Kenya for sexual exploitation in the growing sex tourism industry.

Current Project - Grants for Grandparents - Ndola, Zambia

on Wednesday, 20 March 2013. Posted in Current Projects, Orphanages - Childrens Homes - Rescue Centres, HIV/AIDs & other diseases, Extreme Poverty, Orphans, Sustainability, Zambia

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ity:  Ndola
Project:  Grants for Grandparents

Grants for Grandparents has been established to assist grandparents who are the full time carers of at least one grandchild.

Grants for Grandparents' primary focus is the small African nation of Zambia, where life expectancy is just 49 years of age.

You can sponsor these grandparents

Current Supported Project - New Life - Education Centre - Yangon, Myanmar

on Tuesday, 19 March 2013. Posted in Current Projects, Myanmar, Orphanages - Childrens Homes - Rescue Centres, Schools - Education, HIV/AIDs & other diseases, Extreme Poverty, Exploitation, Infrastructure, Natural Disasters, Orphans, Sustainability

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City:  Yangon
Project:  Education Centre
Partner:  New Life

Currently there are no suitable environments for learning in this region of Yangon. This activity will provide a long term suitably built learning facility for decades to come.

The main objectives of this project are:

A) to increase educational standard in English/Burmese literacy and computer literacy in this community.
B) to establish a preschool facility for community children.
C) to develop a designated library area within the Educational Training Centre.
D) to increase the employment opportunities and thereby reduce poverty in this community.

Current Project - Children’s Welfare Mission - Technical School - Namugongo, Uganda

on Tuesday, 19 June 2012. Posted in Current Projects, Vocational Training - Self Sufficiency - Income Generation, HIV/AIDs & other diseases, War and Conflict, Extreme Poverty, Uganda, Homelessness, Infrastructure, Orphans, Sustainability

Uganda Childrens Welfare Mission - Technical School - Namugongo BE A HERO1Donate Button Small NA

City: Namugongo, Uganda
Project:  Technical School at the Children’s Welfare Village
Partner:  Children’s Welfare Mission
Number of Children: 250

The Children’s Welfare Mission was established in 1990 by the Dutch organization, Stichting Kinderhulp Afrika. This village cares for 250 resident children, complete with housing, a primary school, a secondary school, and a vocational school. Also in the compound are a medical and dental clinic, and a large meeting hall/gymnasium which are available for use by the surrounding community.

HERO IT Donations

on Tuesday, 30 August 2016. Posted in Volunteer, Current News, Operation Educate A Child, Vocational Training - Self Sufficiency - Income Generation, HERO Partner, How to Be A HERO, Infrastructure, Orphans, Sustainability

Cambodia Computer Lab Be A HERO

Donate Button Small AUS
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Computers transform communities

The developed world is now driven by technology.

Through donations of in-date computers and affordable shipping through our HERO Partners, Be A HERO is transforming communities through providing IT equipment and installation.

Donations for shipping would enable more equipment to get to the communities that need it.

Volunteers are often needed to collect and pack the donated computers.

Consider a HERO Holiday if your skills lie in IT and you would like to transform a community.

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